Tag Archives: conservatives

Elections Have Consequences. Remember?

Back in the heady days right after the 2008 election, there was a lot of gloating going on in various Democratic circles, particularly on the progressive blogs, about the Republicans whining about what “could happen.”  One of the sayings thrown back at them was the title of this post, “Elections have consequences.”    It can be put more rudely as “We won, you lost.  It sucks to be you.”   There was a lot of chatter about a “permanent Democratic majority,” and on the state scene here, discussions on how Democrats could take the last two Republican held seats in Congress.  Looking back over the past 4 years, that was hubris, the “pride that goeth before a fall.”   You see, despite saying that elections have consequences, they didn’t believe it.

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Conservatives Are Learning About Being Careful Of What You Wish For

Over the past several years, I’ve had to listen to conservatives talk about “job killing environmental regulations” and how we should be doing more exploitation of fossil fuels.  As they put it during the 2008 campaign, “Drill baby, drill!”  Yes, if only we would wave aside all those “greenies,” open up public land and offshore areas to drilling, build the Keystone XL pipeline, and get out of the hair of those who want to frack new areas, we would hit the promised land of cheap gas and energy independence.   Life would be good, right?

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Opinion Polls Are Meaningless, Votes Aren’t

Over the past week since the election, I have seen a number of political blogs talking about various progressive ideas that are favored by “the majority” of the American people, and  they’ll cite various opinion polls to back that up.  Want a higher minimum wage?  Immigration reform?  Equal pay for equal work?  Those are just a few of the topics that opinion polls will tell you that a majority – sometimes a large majority – of the American people support.   It’s comforting to see, but then you have to look at the actual election results.  Republicans, who have been stridently blocking action on any of those topics, and in many cases are actively against them, just got handed a majority in the Senate and increased their existing one in the House.  There’s a reason for that:  Only about 36% of the eligible voters actually showed up.

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Like Vampires

One of the myths surrounding vampires is that they can’t see their reflection in a mirror.    I’ve come to the belief that there’s a certain “vampiric” nature with conservatives, at least when it comes to seeing their reflection.   I started thinking about this while reading an article about Laurel County in Kentucky.

In southeastern Kentucky, hardship and need seem to spring forth from the cracks and crevices of the lush green rolling hills; they line the dulcet tones of the people who matter-of-factly recount their struggles to stay afloat. For the last half-century, the conundrum of calcified, generational poverty has stumped policymakers, with the luckless denizens of Kentucky’s Appalachian Mountains one of its most enduring symbols.

I’ve seen the same story repeated in many of the rural areas where I’ve lived.   Jobs are few and far between, with those that are there often paying substandard wages.  People struggle to “get by,” and the young leave for better opportunities elsewhere.   Sad?  Yes.  But here’s the thing:  They’re also often represented by … Republicans.

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Religious Business? Some Thoughts

The recent Supreme Court decision about Hobby Lobby being able to deny contraceptive coverage to its employees, because of … religious beliefs … has caused a major uproar.  My opinion is that it’s probably the most weasel-worded, constitutionally questionable decision the Supreme Court has reached in quite some time.   As a concept, the idea of a corporation as a person has any number of good features.  The way conservatives, and in particular this Supreme Court, have extended that to the realms of free speech and religion are not among them.   But, if corporations want to claim religious beliefs as a reason not to provide a benefit for their workers, I have an idea for making them regret it:  Make them live up to it.

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