You Can’t Change The Rules In The Middle Of The Game

There was a story in Wednesday’s  NY Post about potential issues at polling places.  Mainly, that independents are suddenly realizing that New York has a closed primary, and they’re not going to be able to vote in the upcoming primary.  That means that only those registered as Democrats or Republicans are going to get to vote in their party’s primary.

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I Can’t Sell It If I Won’t Buy It

A couple of months ago there was an article on another site arguing that one of the reasons some Democrats were against Bernie Sanders was that they were “afraid to sell the case for higher taxes.”    More particularly, meaning that they aren’t willing to make the case for the tax increases necessary to pay for all the programs he was proposing.   Leaving aside the rather nebulous nature of his healthcare plan, and the unlikelihood of his college plan being accepted,  my response was “Do you really expect me to tell people in my area that their tax bill will double?”  That would be a tough sell in any event, even if I was really enthusiastic about the programs.

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Looking Ahead To 2020 and Beyond

As this year’s seemingly interminable primary season drags on, and we’ve yet to hit election season, I’ve come to realize how spoiled I was by 2012.  That year, everyone knew who the Democratic candidate was going to be (frustrati stupidity aside), and we all got to sit back in stunned disbelief at what the Republicans were doing.  This year showed that both parties nomination process is messy, and that the media gets things wrong more than ever.  So here are some things I’d like to see in the future.

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“Free College” Isn’t Going To Be Free

Over on the People’s View, there’s a post looking at Bernie Sanders “free college” plan.   One can assume that it’s the same as a bill he proposed along those lines.   The idea of “free college,” although it’s really only tuition free college, has caught on with number of people, particularly the younger generation of current (or soon to be) college students.  It’s not a bad idea, except for the problems.  As I said about the healthcare plan, it’s another “alligators in the swamp” problem.  That is, it’s not that the general idea isn’t laudable, it’s the details where things get tricky.  Matthew Yglesias over at Vox has a couple of articles about the problems, and reluctantly concludes that it’s unrealistic.   In looking through the legislation, not only do I agree it’s unrealistic, it’s not going to be “sellable” even to “solid blue states.”

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Red States: Do You Enjoy Getting Hurt?

In the previous post, I talked about the reality that while Republican governors and legislatures have succeeded in implementing their political philosophy in their states, that philosophy has been a miserable failure when it comes to actually delivering what they think it will.  In fact, it has been a disaster for their states.   Besides that, while we like to talk about the economic recovery that the country has seen under President Obama, the sad reality is that it’s been an uneven recovery, particularly for those same states.  That has led to a lot of very angry people who are upset with the Republican Party for not delivering the economic boom they were told they’d have, and as result have been the reason why Donald Trump has had so much support in the primaries.

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