Category Archives: Technology

Windows XP’s Last Day (Sort Of)

In case you haven’t been paying attention, and really, most people don’t to tech news, today is the last day that Microsoft will support Windows XP.   What does that mean?

It means that there will be no more official security updates and bug fixes for the operating system from Microsoft.

Which is going to hit a lot of people, since figures are that up to 30% of Microsoft’s “installed base” (people using their operating systems) are still using XP.  Last year during the Healthcare.gov roll-out, more than a few conservatives and media figures latched onto the notion that some of it was based on “10 year-old technology,” with the implied – or outright said – assertion that private business would never be caught using “obsolete technology.”  Of course, that bears little relation to reality.

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Filed under Business, Technology

You Have The Right To Remain Silent

My previous post was about the misunderstanding of the “freedom of speech” clause in the First Amendment.  That is, having the right to say something doesn’t shield you from the consequences of that speech.  Which leads me to the title of this post, which is the famous first line in the Miranda warning that is a staple on every police show.   It comes from the Fifth Amendment.   Over the past few years of watching the blowback over various statements that have been made, as well as the counter-attacks attempting to mitigate the consequences under the “free speech” banner, I think that the “right to remain silent” is a much under appreciated (and necessary) right that some should be exercising.  Yesterday was a sterling example, as the Justine Sacco fiasco took over Twitter.

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Filed under Business, Politics, Technology

And More Failures!!!

One of the things I’ve been seeing in the news media, particularly stoked by various conservatives, is that the problems with the Healthcare.gov website means that the Affordable Care Act is bad.  Obviously, one is the same as the other, or at least they’d like you to think so.  One is a website, the other is a law.  But since it’s tough – you know, to report real facts – to grasp, particularly when your level of understanding of technology amounts to “press button, get a cookie!”, they’d rather just keep going with that.  In an effort to be helpful, I thought I’d give them some more examples they can use for their “total failure” conflation.

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Filed under Politics, Satire, Technology

“Underlying Complexity” – Why “Simple” Isn’t Easy, Particularly When Republicans Are Involved

In previous posts about the Healthcare.gov website, I’ve been talking about how glitches are to be expected, because there’s a great deal of complexity “under the hood.”  Most people never get to see what goes into a program, or even a web page.  It’s not an issue of the age of the technology, it’s that it’s hard to make things appear “simple and easy.”   Do it right, and everyone thinks it was easy, but to make it that way usually involves dealing with a lot of glitches.  There’s often more “code” than “content” in many places.

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“10 Year Old Technology” Is A Misleading Statement

In looking around the conservative commentary, as well as various other comments highlighted by various news media, I’ve been seeing a constant refrain of “it was built with 10-year-old technology!” with the strong connotations that it was “obsolete” and of course private business would never be caught out like that!   One of the amusing (to me) comments was this one:

“I have never seen a website — in the last five years — require you to delete the cache in an effort to resolve errors,” said Dan Schuyler, a director at Leavitt Partners, a health care group by former Health and Human Services secretary Mike Leavitt. “This is a very early Web 1.0 type of fix.”

He apparently doesn’t browse the web much.  I do, and you know what?  It’s amazing how many sites ask you to do that when something … doesn’t work.  Amazon, Microsoft, Adobe, and a number of others have all suggested that as a “fix” for a problem I’ve had on their websites,  within the past three months.  So pardon me if I take that statement with a grain of salt.   I also take a great deal of issue with the idea that private business is “more up-to-date” than the public sector.

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Filed under Politics, Technology